Symphonies

 

Symphony No. 1 in D major for large orchestra, the first version was entitled Titan after the novel by Jean Paul, composed 1884-1888. Premiere: Budapest 20 November 1889. Several revisions, final version premiered in Berlin on 16 March 1896. Prague premiere: 3 March 1898 at a concert of the German Theatre, cond. G.Mahler

Symphony No. 2 in C minor for soprano, alto, mixed choir and large orchestra, composed 1887-1894, referred to as Resurrection (Auferstehung), text by Friedrich Klopstock and from the collection The Youth´s Magic Horn (Des Knaben Wunderhorn). Premiere: Berlin 13 December 1895. Prague premiere: 3 October 1903, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Oskar Nedbal.

Symphony No. 3 in D minor for alto, children´s choir, women´s choir and large orchestra, composed 1893-1896, text from Thus Spoke Zarathustra  (Also sprach Zarathustra) by Friedrich Nietzsche and from the collection The Youth´s Magic Horn (Des Knaben Wunderhorn). Premiere: Krefeld 9 June 1902. In Prague the second movement (entitled Symphonic Meditation (Symphonische Meditation) was performed at a concert of the German Theatre Orchestra with Leo Blech on 6 March 1902, the whole composition was premiered in Prague by the German Theatre Orchestra, cond. G.Mahler, on 25 February 1904.

Symphony No. 4 in G major for soprano and large orchestra, composed 1899-1900, text Das himmlische Leben from the collection The Youth´s Magic Horn (Des Knaben Wunderhorn). Premiere: München 25 January 1901. Prague premiere 3 November 1907, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Vilém Zemánek.

Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor for large orchestra, composed 1901-1902. Premiere: Cologne 18 October 1904. Prague premiere: 2 March 1905, German Theatre Orchestra, cond. Leo Blech.

Symphony No. 6 in A minor for large orchestra, composed 1903-1905. Premiere: Essen 27 May 1906. Prague premiere: 28 January 1912, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Vilém Zemánek.

Symphony No. 7 in E minor for large orchestra, composed 1904-1905. Premiere: Prague 19 September 1908, joined orchestras of the Czech Philharmonic and the German Theatre, cond. Gustav Mahler.

Symphony No. 8 in E flat major for three sopranos, two altos, tenor, baritone and bass, boys´ choir, two mixed choirs and large orchestra, composed 1906-1907, text – part I: hymn Veni creator spiritus, part II: closing scene from Goethe´s Faust. Premiere: München 12 September 1910. Prague premiere: 28 and 29 March 1912, German Theatre Orchestra, cond. Alexander Zemlinsky.

The Song of the Earth (Das Lied von der Erde), song cycle for tenor and alto or baritone and orchestra, composed 1907-1908, text from the collection The Chinese Flute (Die chinesische Flöte) by Hans Bethge. Premiere: München 20 November 1911, cond. Bruno Walter. Prague premiere: 3 April 1913, German Theatre Orchestra, cond. Alexander Zemlinsky.

Symphony No. 9 in D major for large orchestra, composed 1909-1910. Premiere: Vienna 26 June 1912, cond. Bruno Walter. Prague premiere: 6 January 1918, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Otakar Ostrčil.

Adagio from the unfinished Symphony No. 10 in F sharp for large orchestra, composed
1910, arranged by Ernst Křenek in 1924. Premiere: Vienna 12 October 1924. Prague premiere: 11 December 1924, German Theatre Orchestra, cond. Alexander Zemlinsky.
 

Cantata

 

The Song of Sorrow (Das klagende Lied) for soprano, alto and tenor, mixed choir and large orchestra, Mahler´s own text based on a collection of German fairy-tales. Composed 1878-1899, three versions, final version was premiered in Vienna on 17 February 1901. Prague premiere: 3 March 1910, German Theatre Orchestra, cond. Paul Ottenheimer.

Songs with orchestra

(also in arrangment for voice and piano)
 

Songs of a Wayfarer (Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen) for baritone or alto and large orchestra, four songs originally composed for voice and piano 1883-1885, texts by Mahler influenced probably by poems from Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Premiere of the cycle was in Berlin 16 March 1896. The song Ging heut’ morgen übers Feld (then called Lied der fahrenden Gesellen) was most probably performed for the first time in Prague at a concert of the German Theatre Orchestra on 18 April 1886, solo Betty Frank, piano G.Mahler. This concert was Mahler´s first public appearance as composer. Prague premiere of the whole cycle: 16 March 1901, German Theatre Orchestra, solo Erich Hunold, cond. Richard Strauss.

Songs from The Youth´s Magic Horn (Lieder aus Des Knaben Wunderhorn) ten songs for alto or baritone and large orchestra, folk texts from the collection of the same name. Composed 1892-1898. Published 1899.

Songs on the Death of Children (Kindertotenlieder) five songs for alto and large orchestra, composed 1901-1904, text by Friedrich Rückert. Premiere: Vienna 1905. Prague premiere: 16 October 1907, German Theatre Orchestra, solo Johann Messchaert, cond. Paul Ottenheimer.

Seven Songs of Latter Days (Sieben Lieder aus letzter Zeit) for voice and orchestra, composed 1899-1903, five songs to poems by Friedrich Rückert (Fünf Rückertlieder) and two from Des Knaben Wunderhorn, published 1905.

 

Songs with piano

 

The Songs of Youth (Lieder und Gesänge aus der Jugendzeit) 14 songs for voice and piano, composed 1880-1892, texts by various authors and from Des Knaben Wunderhorn, published in three volumes 1892. The song Hans und Grete (= Maientanz im Grünen) and an unidentified song Steh’ auf!  were performed by Betty Frank with Mahler at the piano for the first time at a concert of the German Theatre Orchestra in Prague on 18 August 1886.